Biking and Mountain Biking Glacier National Park & Western Montana

Biking and Mountain Biking

Enter to win a one-year pass to Montana’s Glacier National Park (plus 2,000 federal recreation sites).

Enter to win a one-year pass to Montana’s Glacier National Park.

Bike It Out

With many towns in Western Montana surrounded by wilderness, our region is a haven for mountain bikers searching for easily accessible trails and terrain. From the Bitterroot Valley in the south to Whitefish in the north, our diverse selection of trails is sure to fit what you're looking for, whether it's a family friendly ride or intense freeriding.

Didn't bring your bike? Not a worry. Check out available bike rentals.

Play it safe and be sure to stop in at a visitor center, ranger station or forest service office and pick up trail maps.

Happy Centennial, National Park Service

We're celebrating 100 years of the National Park Service by inviting you to enter to win weekly prizes and a grand prize 5-day road trip from Wyoming to Montana.


Biking Trails and Locations

Northern Tier

Whitefish Mountain Resort

With nearly 30 miles of lift-accessed and cross country mountain bike trails, Whitefish Mountain Resort has distinguished itself as a worthy mountain biking destination. Plus, the resort's extensive network of trails caters to all ability levels.

For one of the most scenic rides in Montana, try the Summit Trail. To fine-tune your technical riding, take Question Mark. Or for an exhilarating freeride, try Runaway Train.

The resort also offers Mountain Bike Academy for kids (ages 8 - 17) during the summer months, with coaches teaching the technical aspects of trail riding on various terrains.

Getting Here:

The Big Mountain is located 36 miles west of Glacier National Park, 23 miles from Kalispell and 8 miles north of Whitefish, Montana off North/South Highway U.S. 93 and East/West U.S. Highway 2.

Whitefish Mountain Resort is located 8 miles north of Whitefish and 23 miles north of Kalispell. Glacier Park International Airport is served daily by flights from Salt Lake City (Delta), Minneapolis (Delta), Seattle (Alaska/Horizon), and Denver (United). Shuttle service and car rentals are available at the airport. The historic Whitefish Depot is served daily by rail (Amtrak's Empire Builder) from Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis and Chicago, as well as points in between.

More Information

skiwhitefish.com


The Whitefish Trail

An anchor project of the Whitefish Legacy Partners, a non-profit conservation organization, this trail provides 22 miles of new trails for hikers and bikers (as well as skiers and equestrians) and is well-marked for moderate to intermediate trail experiences. The trail provides a beautiful ride through the woods, with glimpses of nearby lakes and the Whitefish Mountain Range. Future plans include a recreational trail system consisting of 55 miles over the next five years.

Getting Here:

The trailhead at Lion Mountain Loop is just two miles from downtown Whitefish.

More Information:

www.whitefishlegacy.org


Glacier National Park

The Going-to-the-Sun Road is an ideal ride through one of Montana’s icons. During the busy season of summer, there are time restrictions as to when cyclists can be on the road, making spring and fall both ideal times to cruise the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

Our suggestion: pedal the Going-to-the-Sun Road from West Glacier over Logan Pass to St. Mary before ending your ride in East Glacier. Once there, hop aboard Amtrak’s Empire Builder (bike and all) for a relaxing ride back to West Glacier.

Getting Here:

From Columbia Falls, travel east on Highway 2 to West Glacier. Turn left onto the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

More Information:

www.nps.gov/glac/


Fisher Divide Trail

This trail is located mostly on or near ridge tops, offering beautiful views of the Cabinet Mountain Wilderness. This easy 11.5-mile trail starts at Teepee Lake and ends just below the top of Brush Mountain.

Getting Here:

From Libby, travel 20.5 miles south to US Highway 2. Turn left on Teepee Creek Road 6740 and follow 7.3 miles to Teepee Lake. The trail beings near the east side of the lake.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai/


Southern Tier

Blue Mountain Recreation Area

A diversified use area, Blue Mountain Recreation Area has ATV and motorcycle trails, horse and foot-only trails, mountain biking trails, a handicapped access overlook and an interpretive trail. Sitting above the recreation area is an active fire lookout, as well as the Graves Range Trail for 4x4 driving. The Maclay Flat Interpretive Trail also provides 1.5 miles of accessible trail along the Bitterroot River.

Getting Here:

The recreation area is located two miles southwest of Missoula. Take Highway 93 south to Blue Mountain Road and follow for one mile. The next left is Lookout Road, while the next right is the Maclay Flat Area.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Holloman/Plant Creek Loop Trail

Beginning at Miller Creek, this trail (9999) features 1.5 miles of dirt road, followed by 2 miles on a grass-covered logging road. It continues down the ridge, joining Plant Creek Road. During summer, watch for logging trucks and other traffic.

Getting Here:

Take Highway 93 south to Miller Creek Road and follow to Holloman or Plant Creek roads. Either will lead you to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


John Long Trail

From the West Fork of Tyler Saddle, this trail (21) is a single track to the top of Sliderock Mountain, where it connects with several trails in the Deerlodge Forest. The trailhead begins at Forest Service Road 1707.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, take I-90 east to the Beavertail Hill Exit. Take a left on Road 354 and follow to West Fork Tyler Saddle.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Pattee Canyon Recreation Area

Located in a wooded canyon near Missoula and sitting at 4,100 feet, Pattee Canyon is a popular location for day hikes and mountain biking. It also has picnic sites and group sites available.

Ride the Sam Braxton National Recreation Trail, as it loops around the southeast portion of the Pattee Canyon Recreation Area. The trail begins at the trailhead and ends at the loop for a distance of 3.5 miles.

Getting Here:

From downtown Missoula, follow Higgins Avenue south. Turn left onto Pattee Canyon Road and follow for 3 miles.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Rattlesnake National Recreation Area and Wilderness

With its major trailhead only 4 miles north of Missoula, this 61,000-acre area forms Montana’s premier urban wilderness, blending wilderness and civilization. For biking, try the Rattlesnake Main Trail (515), Ravine Creek Trail (34), Sawmill Trail (24) or Woods Gulch Trail (513).

Getting Here:

From I-90 in Missoula, take the Van Buren Street Exit and head north. Van Buren Street turns into Rattlesnake Drive. Continue to follow for 3 miles until you reach the entrance.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Ron MacDonald Riverfront Trail System

The riverfront trail follows the Clark Fork River in downtown Missoula before connecting to the Kim Williams Nature Trail, providing users with 7 miles of uninterrupted trail access. You can cross the river on one of three bridges along the trail—Orange Street, Higgins Avenue and the Madison Street bridge, as well as three footbridges—Van Buren, one under the Madison Street Bridge and the third just off California Street.

Getting Here:

The trail is accessible from many points in downtown and along the river.

More Information:

www.missoulaparks.org


Sandstone Ridge Trail

This trail (228) goes to the top of the east side of Rock Creek, following the ridge north to Brewster Creek Road. The total length is 11 miles and it features views of Rock Creek on the west and Flint Creek on the east.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take Rock Creek Road past Hogback Creek. Look for the Sandstone/Wyman Trailhead at the top of the drainage.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Skookum Butte Trail

This short trail (304) follows switchbacks to an old lookout and features views of Lolo Creek and the Graves Range.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, travel south to Lolo. Take Highway 12 south, turning left on Elk Meadows Road and follow until you just cross the Idaho border. The trail sign is on the north side of the road.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


State Line Trail

This trail (46) follows the Idaho/Montana border along the Bitterroot Divide and showcases beautiful views of both states. The trail begins at Forest Service Road 595 and ends at Cache Saddle, for a length of 17 miles.

Getting Here:

From Lolo, take Highway 12 south to Fish Creek Road. Follow north 2 miles to Road 9942. Continue to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Morrell Falls National Recreation Trail

One of the most popular trails in the Seeley Lake Ranger District, this 5-mile round-trip route leads to Morrell Lake and Morrell Falls at the base of the Swan Mountain Range.

Getting Here:

From the town of Seeley Lake, travel .5 miles north on Highway 83. Turn right on Morrell Creek Road which becomes Forest Service Road #477/Cottonwood Lakes Road and travel 1.1 miles. Turn left on West Morrell Road #4353 and travel about 6 miles. Turn right on Pyramid Pass Road #4381 and travel .25 miles. Then turn left on Morrell Falls Road #4364. Continue for 1 mile to the Morrell Falls Trailhead and parking area.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Camas Creek Trail

This moderately difficult 3.5-mile trail, located in the Bitterroot National Forest, begins at Forest Service Road 596 and ends at Camas Lake.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, take Highway 93 south to Hamilton. Continue south for 9 miles and turn right on Lost Horse Road. Continue for 2 miles before turning right at the Forest Service Camas Creek sign. Follow the road for 6 miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Montana Snowbowl

Located a short drive from Missoula, Snowbowl has five trail routes for more than 30 miles of riding. For beautiful views of the Missoula Valley, take the 6.7-mile long Spitfire Trail. Or for more technical riding, take the 5.5-mile Beargrass Highway Trail.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, take Reserve Street north, where it turns into Grant Creek Road. Follow Grant Creek Road for 3 miles before turning left onto Snowbowl Road. Continue 6 miles to Snowbowl.

More Information:

www.montanasnowbowl.com


CC Divide Trail

This scenic, mostly ridgeline trail provides beautiful views of several drainages. The trail begins at Forest Service Road 378 and ends at Forest Service Road 7709, for a total of 13 miles. It has several access points.

Getting Here:

From Plains, travel south of Road 508 to its junction with Combest Road 7698. Turn right and drive 3 miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Gilt Edge Creek Trail

Passing through an old mining town on the eastern end, this trail (268) follows the creek. It begins at Forest Service Road 386 and ends at the state line, for a length of 4.4 miles.

Getting Here:

From I-90 west, take the Saltese Exit (10). Follow Silver Creek Road 5.1 miles to State Line Road 391. Continue 1 mile southeast to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Heart Lake Trail

This easy trail (171) leads to the largest lake in the district. Following the South Fork of Trout Creek, it provides beautiful views of the divide before ending at Heart Lake. From here, you can also access the Pearl Lake Trail.

Getting Here:

From Superior, travel east on the frontage road toward Trout Creek campground. Travel 15 miles up Trout Creek to the Heart Lake Trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Hiawatha Rail Trail

This portion of the Olympian Hiawatha route is noted as one of the most breathtaking scenic stretches of railroad in the country. Operated by Lookout Pass Ski Area, the 15-mile route takes riders through 10 tunnels and across 7 high trestles.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take the Taft Exit (5), running south. Turn left at the stop sign, cross a small bridge and follow the signs for 2.5 miles on Rainy Creek Road 506.

More Information:

www.skilookout.com


Ninemile Divide Trail

This trail (51) runs along or close to the ridge top, taking riders through lodgepole pine stands, beargrass and huckleberry patches. Along its 4-mile route, it provides pretty views of the Clark Fork Valley and side drainages.

Getting Here:

This trail can be accessed by Ninemile Divide Road 97 or from First Creek road 536 east of Superior.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


River Trail

The River Trail (223) provides a variety of views and topography, with parts of the trail following the Clark Fork River. The trail’s total length is 9 miles and is rated as intermediate to difficult.

Getting Here:

The north trailhead can be accessed from Highway 135 between St. Regis and Paradise on the west side by 14 Mile Bridge. To access the south trailhead, follows Old Mullan Road from St. Regis for nearly 1 mile. Turn left on Road 439 and continue for 2 miles to its junction with Road 9113. Continue 1 mile.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


St. Regis Lakes Trail

This trail (267) provides splendid views of alpine country and flora, as the trail begins at County Road and ends at Lower St. Regis Lake.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take the Lookout Pass Exit. Travel south on Road 7896 on the south side of the interstate. Proceed 1 mile to where the road begins to loop, taking the first road to the right.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Storm Peak Trail

A ridge trail, Storm Peak (255) provides good views of the Ward/Eagle Peak Area, as well as alpine lakes. It begins at Haugan and ends at State Line Road 391, for a length of nearly 10 miles.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take the Haugan Exit. Turn south under the interstate, then right before crossing the railroad tracks. Continue for nearly 1 mile (this part of the road in on private property – please be respectful) to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Albert Point Trail

This 7-mile trail (719) begins at Forest Service Road 5565 and ends at Trail 720.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take the Petty Creek Exit. Go south across the river, turning east onto Southside Road 453. Follow for 14 miles to Albert Creek Road 5568. Follow 4.5 miles to trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Cache Creek Trail

This trail goes from Clearwater Crossing on the West Fork of Fish Creek up to the Idaho/Montana state line. It can also be made into a loop trail by following the Divide Trail north before following one of the many trails back to Clearwater Crossing. This trail is 11 miles long.  From Clearwater Crossing, you can also take the West Fork Fish Creek Trail (101).

Getting Here:

From Missoula, take I-90 west to the Fish Creek Exit. When the road forks, take the west fork to Clearwater Crossing.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Cedar Log Lake Trail

This trail climbs up to an alpine lake, just under the Continental Divide.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, take I-90 west to the Fish Creek Exit. Take Fish Creek Road 343 south for 9 miles, before turning west onto West Fish Creek Road 7750. Continue for 7 miles to Clearwater Crossing.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Kreis Pond Mountain Bike Trails

This trail system begins and ends at Kreis Pond Picnic Area and Campground, with four trails for various levels of riders covering 25 miles on gravel roads and dirt trails.

Getting Here:

From I-90 West, take Exit 82. Travel north to the Ninemile Ranger Station.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Reservation Divide Trail

This trail (98) follows the ridgeline and can be accessed from various trails, including Burnt Fork Trail 418, Edith Peak Road 476, Squaw Peak Trail 707, Kennedy Creek Trail 746 and McCormick Peak Trail 708. The trail travels nearly 26 miles, beginning at Siegal Pass near Forest Service Road 54988 and ending at Squaw Peak Road 476.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, travel west on I-90 to Exit 82. Turn right, travel 2 miles and turn north just before Ninemile House Restaurant. Continue 2 miles to Ninemile Road, bearing west. Take Forest Service Road 393 13 miles and turn north on Foothill Road. Continue 11 miles to Ninemile-Sigel Road, turning onto 5572.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Stark Mountain Trail

This trail (58) goes 4.5 miles from the Ninemile Valley to Stark Mountain Lookout.

Getting Here:

From Missoula, take I-90 west. Take the Ninemile Exit north. At the next junction, take Remount Road and follow to a four-way intersection. At the intersection, go left up Ninemile Creek. Follow Forest Service Road 5511 and take a left at the end of the pavement. Continue to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Straight Creek Trail

This trail (99) travels up to the State Line Divide Trail on the Idaho/Montana border. Following a creek and featuring old grown forests, this 10-mile trail crosses Straight Creek several times.

Getting Here:

Travel west from Missoula on I-90 to Fish Creek Road, Exit 66. Follow Fish Creek Road 343 south nine mile, turn west onto 7750 and continue for about 7 miles to Clearwater Crossing Campground.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


White Mountain Trail

This trail (318) is one of the Granite Pass area trails to the Bitterroot Divide. Beginning at White Mountain Lookout and ending at Trail 316, this 3-mile trail takes riders through high and dry country.

Getting Here:

From Lolo, take Highway 12 to the Fish Creek Road (just past Lolo Hot Springs). From here, follow directions on the Lolo West map.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo

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Biking in Glacier National Park and Western Montana

Western Montana's Glacier Country

News from Glacier National Park: Currently all of the Going-to-the-Sun Road is open for travel.

Bird Woman Falls

An icon in Glacier National Park, Bird Woman Falls is a glistening 492-foot-high waterfall that cascades down the side of Mt. Oberlin. From West Glacier, travel the Going-to-the-Sun Road to Bird Woman Falls Overlook, located on the west side of the Continental Divide.

Trail of the Cedars

This short boardwalk trail (ADA accessible) takes visitors through an old growth cedar forest. It’s also the beginning of the Avalanche Lake Trail (just over two miles long) that leads to Avalanche Lake—one of the most popular day hikes in Glacier National Park. Trail of the Cedars is located about five and a half miles north of Lake McDonald Lodge.

Drive the Going-to-the-Sun Road

If your time in Glacier National Park is limited, one must-see attraction is the Going-to-the-Sun Road. This 50-mile long road takes travelers between St. Mary and West Glacier through the heart of the park, crossing the Continental Divide at Logan Pass. There are numerous pullouts along the road, ideal for taking photographs and enjoying the scenery.

See a Glacier

As you’re traveling the Going-to-the-Sun Road, pull over at Jackson Glacier Overlook (located east of Logan Pass). The overlook offers the best opportunity to see a glacier from the road.

Many Glacier Valley

Home to incredible mountains, active glaciers, abundant wildlife and miles of hiking trails, Many Glacier is located in the northeast section of Glacier National Park. Trails leave from this valley in numerous directions, with popular hiking destinations including Iceberg Lake, Grinnell Lake and Ptarmigan Tunnel.

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