Hiking Glacier National Park & Western Montana

Hiking

Enter to win a one-year pass to Montana’s Glacier National Park (plus 2,000 federal recreation sites).

Enter to win a one-year pass to Montana’s Glacier National Park.

Hike it Out

Western Montana is a true hiker's haven, with thousands of miles that lead into all types of terrain. Explore the more than 730 miles of trails in Glacier National Park or take a hike in Montana's urban wilderness—the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area & Wilderness. Take time to enjoy the views, fresh mountain air and wildlife watching as you hike in through Montana.

Trail Safety:

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Northern Tier

Holland Falls Nature Trail

This short trail begins at the junction of trail 415 and ends at Holland Falls.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/flathead/


Ralph Thayer Memorial National Recreation Trail

This 17-mile long trail provides moderate to difficult hiking, with exceptional views of the Flathead Valley, Cabinet Mountains and Glacier National Park.

Getting Here:

From Columbia Falls, travel 40 miles to Big Creek Road 316.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/flathead/


Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex

Encompassing more than 1.5 million acres, this complex includes three wilderness areas: the Bob Marshall, Scapegoat and Great Bear. Numerous trails provide plentiful hiking opportunities.

Getting Here:

From the west side of the Rocky Mountains, The Bob can be reached from Hungry Horse, Kalispell, Lincoln, Ovando, Seeley Lake and Swan Lake, while the east side has access from Augusta, Browning, Bynum, Choteau and Dupuyer.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/flathead/


Mission Mountains Wilderness Complex

The Mission Mountain Range is the gateway to the Mission Mountain Wilderness Area, a 73,877-acre paradise ideal for hiking, camping and fishing. Its diverse topography includes rugged peaks, alpine lakes and wildflower meadows. Look for the 9,280-foot McDonald Peak on the complex's east end. Along the western slope of the wilderness is 89,500 acres of Tribal Wilderness. When recreating on tribal lands, be sure to obtain and carry a tribal recreation permit.

Getting Here:

From MT Highway 83, travel 19 miles north of Seeley Lake, turn on Kraft Creek Road and continue for seven miles. Turn right on Forest Service Road 9576 and follow for half-mile to the trailhead for Hemlock Lake Trail 607.

To access the Tribal Wilderness, take US Highway 93 north through St. Ignatius, turning east on Mission Reservoir Road. Continue 3 miles, turn right and travel one mile. Turn left and drive half-mile to the Mission Dam, campground and trailhead.

More Information:

www.visitmt.com/categories/moreinfo.asp?SiteID=1&IDRRecordID=691
www.fs.usda.gov/flathead/


Whitefish Mountain Resort

The Danny On Trail leaves directly from Whitefish Mountain Resort Village, where it makes its way up the slopes of Big Mountain, passing wildflowers as it continues to the summit. The trail offers beautiful views of the valley and surrounding mountains. There are four loops and routes on the trail, allowing hikers to pick their trail length, with the shortest being nearly four miles and the longest being just over five and a half miles.

Getting Here:

Whitefish Mountain Resort is located eight miles north of Whitefish and 23 miles north of Kalispell.

More Information:

www.skiwhitefish.com


Glacier National Park

With more than 700 miles of trails in the park, outstanding opportunities for short hikes and multi-day backpacking trips abound. Several hikes in the park are self-guided and interpretive, allowing hikers to explore the trail at their own pace.

For a short hike in the North Fork, try Hidden Meadow. Or for a longer hike, try Kintla Lake Head or hike to Numa Lookout from Bowman Lake.

From Logan Pass, hike to the Hidden Lake Overlook or set off on the Highline Trail and walk along the Garden Wall. In the Many Glacier Valley, combine your hike with a boat trip and hike to Grinnell Lake. In the Lake McDonald Area, stroll the Trail of the Cedars or for a more invigorating hike, hike to Huckleberry Lookout.

For Glacier National Park trails, maps and current conditions, go to the National Park Service website.

Cliff Point Trail

This trail follows a series of switchbacks to Cliff Point before following the ridgeline between the Little North Fork/Big Creek and Gold Creek drainages. This six mile long trail is moderately difficult and has light use.

Getting Here:

From Rexford, travel seven miles south on Highway 37 to the Koocanusa Bridge. Cross the bridge and travel south of Road 228 for nearly five miles to the junction with the lower trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Eureka Riverwalk

This two mile loop trail leaves the Historic Village Area in Eureka and continues along the Tobacco River. It's a great walk for all ages.

Getting Here:

The hike travels south and east from the Historical Village Area just off Highway 93 on the south side of town.

More Information:

www.welcome2eureka.com


Inch Mountain Trail

This nearly five mile long trail is a low difficulty, light use begins at the Saddle of Sutton/Little Sutton and ends at Little Sutton Mountain.

Getting Here:

From Eureka, travel 20 miles south on Highway 37 to its junction with Sutton Creek Road 619. Continue two miles on Road 619 to its junction with Flat Creek Road 7993. Take Road 7993 nine and a half miles to the trailhead at Flat Creek Saddle.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Knife Point Trail

This two and a half mile long trail is moderately difficult and stretches from Big Creek Road 336 to Boulder Creek Road 7183.

Getting Here:

Travel 15 miles south of Eureka on Highway 37, crossing the Koocanusa Bridge. Proceed south on Road 228 for eight miles to its junction with Big Creek Road 336. Continue on Road 336 for nearly five miles to the lower trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Little North Fork Falls

This short trail takes a moderately easy climb before dropping into the Little North Fork Creek. Views of waterfalls are available before ending in a rainforest type gorge.

Getting Here:

From Rexford, travel seven miles south past the Koocanusa Bridge. Take Road 336 and follow for one mile to the marked trail.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Ant Flat Historic Site/Nature Trail #348

One of the first ranger stations on the Kootenai Forest, it's now an environmental education center. The trail leads to a viewing platform where visitors can see a marshland ecosystem. The trail is wheelchair access to the platform and foot travel for the remaining mile.

Getting Here:

From Fortine, travel two miles southeast on US Highway 93. Turn right on Road 36 and continue one mile.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Blue Sky Trail

This easy trail follows Blue Sky Creek.

Getting Here:

From Fortine, travel north three miles on US Highway 93. Turn right on Grave Creek Road 114 and continue 11.5 miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Deep Creek Trail

This gently sloping trail climbs above the north side of Deep Creek to Locke Ridge. It's an easy hike, with views of three small lakes.

Getting Here:

From Fortine, take US 93 to Deep Creek Road 368. Travel five and a half miles, turning left before crossing Deep Creek Bridge. Walk 1.5 miles on the road to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Whitefish Divide Trail

This moderately difficult ridgeline trail accesses several high alpine lakes, as well as numerous trails that lead into Glacier National Park and other mountain ranges.

Getting Here:

From Fortine, travel south on US Highway 93 for 25 miles. Turn on Deep Creek Road 368 and follow for seven miles. Walk one and a half miles to the end of the road. Take Trail 311 for two miles to its junction with Whitefish Divide Trail.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Alexander Mountain Trail

This trail offers a scenic overlook of Lake Koocanusa after a short half-mile hike on the trail. For a more rugged day hike, continue on the trail.

Getting Here:

From Libby, travel northeast on Highway 37 for 12 miles. Turn left onto Forest Development Road 228 and continue for five miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Bighorn Trail

This prehistoric trail follows the river though old orchards and bighorn sheep ranges. A popular trail, benches are located along its route.

Getting Here:

From Libby, turn off on Highway 37 onto Kootenai River Road. Follow for seven miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Cabinet Mountains Wilderness

Located about 15 miles southwest of Libby, the wilderness contains some of the most beautiful scenery in Western Montana, with elevations ranging from 3,000 feet to 8,738 feet. Trail difficulty varies from easy stream bottoms to sweet switchbacks.

Getting Here:

From Montana 56 (about 23 miles south of Troy and 16 miles north of MT 200), turn east on South Fork Bull Road and drive just over two miles. Turn left and go half-mile miles to Forest Service Road 2722 to the turnoff for the Middle Fork Bull River Trail 978. Turn right and proceed nearly a half-mile to the trailhead for Trail 978. To access Trail 972, continue just under one and a half miles.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Fisher Divide Trail

This trail is located mostly on or near ridge tops, offering beautiful views of the Cabinet Mountain Wilderness. This easy 11.5-mile trail starts at Teepee Lake and ends just below the top of Brush Mountain.

Getting Here:

From Libby, travel 20.5 miles south to US Highway 2. Turn left on Teepee Creek Road 6740 and follow just over seven miles to Teepee Lake. The trail beings near the east side of the lake.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Leigh Lake Trail

This short, steep trail is a heavily used access point into the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness. Hikers will most likely share the trail with mountain goats.

Getting Here:

From Libby, travel seven miles south on US Highway 2. Turn right on Bear Creek Road and travel three miles to Cherry Creek Road 867. Turn right and follow for four miles. Next, turn right on Leigh Creek Road 4786 and follow two miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Northwest Peak Trail

This trail includes an easy climb for the first half of its route, while the latter half has stepper grades.

Getting Here:

From Troy, travel west on US Highway 2 for 10 miles. Turn onto Highway 508/Yaak Road 92 and follow to Pete Creek Road 338. Turn northwest and take Pete Creek Road 22 miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/kootenai


Ann Arbor Trail

This three mile steep trail provides hikers and backpackers with good views.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take Superior Exit 47. Go nearly five miles on the south side frontage road to Dry Creek Road 342. Continue on Dry Creek Road for eight miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


St. Regis Lakes Trail

This all-season area has beautiful views of alpine country.

Getting Here:

From I-90, take the Lookout Pass Exit. Go south on Road 7896 and proceed one mile to where the road begins to loop. Take the first road to the right, crossing the old railroad grade.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Honeymoon Creek Trail

This trail goes through steep timbered terrain, leading to sub-alpine areas and lakes.

Getting Here:

Take Thompson River Road 556 (about five miles east of Thompson Falls) north for seven miles. Turn left on Forest Road 603 and continue one and a half miles to the junction with Liver Ridge Road. Follow one mile to Honeymoon Creek and the beginning of the trail.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Southern Tier

Blue Mountain Nature Trail

Blue Mountain Nature Trail is a popular trail at Blue Mountain Recreation Area. Sitting above the recreation area is an active fire lookout, as well as the Graves Range Trail for 4x4 driving. The Maclay Flat Interpretive Trail also provides a mile and a half of accessible trail along the Bitterroot River.

Getting Here:

The recreation area is located two miles southwest of Missoula. Take Highway 93 south to Blue Mountain Road and follow for one mile. The next left is Lookout Road, while the next right is the Maclay Flat Area.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Kim Williams Nature Trail

This trail utilizes an old Milwaukee Railroad grade and passes through a 134-acre nature area. With its wide, flat pathway it has a variety of uses and can accommodate people with small children.

Getting Here:

The Kim Williams Nature Trail is part of Missoula City Parks and can be accessed off of Van Buren Street and 5th Street in Missoula.

More Information:

www.missoulaparks.org


Ron MacDonald Riverfront Trail System

The riverfront trail follows the Clark Fork River in downtown Missoula before connecting to the Kim Williams Nature Trail, providing users with seven miles of uninterrupted trail access. You can cross the river on one of three bridges along the trail—Orange Street, Higgins Avenue and the Madison Street bridge, as well as three footbridges—Van Buren, one under the Madison Street Bridge and the third just off California Street.

Getting Here:

The trail is accessible from many points in downtown and along the river.

More Information:

www.missoulaparks.org


Mount Sentinel “The M”

One of the most popular hikes in Montana leads to the “M” above The University of Montana. This steep, zigzag path includes 11 switchbacks and gains 620 feet in elevation in under a mile.

Getting Here:

The trail starts at the eastern edge of The University of Montana campus.

More Information:

www.missoulaparks.org


Pattee Canyon Recreation Area

Located in a wooded canyon near Missoula and sitting at 4,100 feet, Pattee Canyon is a popular location for day hikes and mountain biking. It also has picnic sites and group sites available.

Getting Here:

From downtown Missoula, follow Higgins Avenue south. Turn left onto Pattee Canyon Road and follow for three miles.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Rattlesnake National Recreation Area and Wilderness

With its major trailhead only four miles north of Missoula, this 61,000-acre area forms Montana’s premier urban wilderness, blending wilderness and civilization. For hiking, try Boulder Lake Trail (333), Rattlesnake Main Trail (515) or Woods Gulch Trail (513).

Getting Here:

From I-90 in Missoula, take the Van Buren Street Exit and head north. Van Buren Street turns into Rattlesnake Drive. Continue to follow for three miles until you reach the entrance.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Morrell Falls National Recreation Trail

One of the most popular trails in the Seeley Lake Ranger District, this five mile round-trip route leads to Morrell Lake and Morrell Falls at the base of the Swan Mountain Range.

Getting Here:

From the town of Seeley Lake, travel half-mile north on Highway 83. Turn right on Morrell Creek Road which becomes Forest Service Road #477/Cottonwood Lakes Road and travel just over one mile. Turn left on West Morrell Road #4353 and travel about six miles. Turn right on Pyramid Pass Road #4381 and travel a quarter of a mile. Then turn left on Morrell Falls Road #4364. Continue for one mile to the Morrell Falls Trailhead and parking area.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/lolo


Blodgett Canyon

Located in the Bitterroot Valley, Blodgett is wide, rocky and deep, making it one of the most dramatic sights in the valley. While it’s beautiful any time of year, winter requires four-wheel drive and snowshoes.

Getting Here:

From Hamilton, take Main Street west into the foothills of the Bitterroot Mountains, following signs to the Blodgett Trailhead and overlook.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Baker Lake Trail

Providing quick access to Baker Lake, this trail is moderately difficult, steep and has heavy use.

Getting Here:

From Darby, continue four miles south to West Fork Road 473. Continue seven miles to Baker Lake Road 363. At the fork in the road, take Road 5634 to the end.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Lake Como National Recreational Loop Trail

This trail wraps around the lake for seven miles.

Getting Here:

From Darby, take US Highway 93 north for four miles. Take a left on Road 82 and follow the signs to Lake Como.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Rock Creek Trail

This low difficulty trail provides beautiful views of the mountains and is ideal for viewing wildlife.

Getting Here:

Follow Highway 93 south from Hamilton for about 12 miles. Turn south on Lake Como Road 550 and follow west. The trailhead is located by the stock loading ramp.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Trapper Creek Trail

This trail is moderately difficult and stretched five miles across the Bitterroot National Forest.

Getting Here:

From Hamilton, take Highway 93 south for 21 miles to West Fork Road. Turn right and continue six miles to the Trapper-Chaffin Road. Turn right and drive a half-mile to Little Trapper junction. Keep left and continue nearly three miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Kootenai Creek Trail

This well-maintained trail is ideal for moderate hikers, with high stock and foot use.

Getting Here:

From the Stevensville junction on Highway 93, travel north one mile. Turn west on Kootenai Creek Road and continue two miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Saint Mary Peak Trail

This four and a half mile trail is moderately difficult.

Getting Here:

From the Stevensville junction, travel three and a half miles south on Highway 93. Turn west on Indian Prairie Loop. Continue west to St. Mary Road. From there continue one miles to the junction of McCalla Ridge Road and St. Mary’s Peak Road. Travel 14 miles to the trailhead.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot


Continental Divide National Scenic Trail 9

This low difficulty trail is 25 miles long, with much of its path on a portion of the southeast boundary between the Bitterroot National Forest and Beaverhead National Forest. The trail beings at Chief Joseph Pass and ends at Beaverhead-Deerlodge Trail #374. Hikers along this trail will have views of the Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness and the beautiful Big Hole Valley.

Getting Here:

For directions, please call Sula Ranger District, 406.821.3201.

More Information:

www.fs.usda.gov/bitterroot

For more trails in Western Montana, visit the websites included above.


Hiking Guides

Discover

Hiking in Western Montana & Glacier National Park

Western Montana's Glacier Country

News from Glacier National Park: Currently all of the Going-to-the-Sun Road is open for travel.

Bird Woman Falls

An icon in Glacier National Park, Bird Woman Falls is a glistening 492-foot-high waterfall that cascades down the side of Mt. Oberlin. From West Glacier, travel the Going-to-the-Sun Road to Bird Woman Falls Overlook, located on the west side of the Continental Divide.

Trail of the Cedars

This short boardwalk trail (ADA accessible) takes visitors through an old growth cedar forest. It’s also the beginning of the Avalanche Lake Trail (just over two miles long) that leads to Avalanche Lake—one of the most popular day hikes in Glacier National Park. Trail of the Cedars is located about five and a half miles north of Lake McDonald Lodge.

Drive the Going-to-the-Sun Road

If your time in Glacier National Park is limited, one must-see attraction is the Going-to-the-Sun Road. This 50-mile long road takes travelers between St. Mary and West Glacier through the heart of the park, crossing the Continental Divide at Logan Pass. There are numerous pullouts along the road, ideal for taking photographs and enjoying the scenery.

See a Glacier

As you’re traveling the Going-to-the-Sun Road, pull over at Jackson Glacier Overlook (located east of Logan Pass). The overlook offers the best opportunity to see a glacier from the road.

Many Glacier Valley

Home to incredible mountains, active glaciers, abundant wildlife and miles of hiking trails, Many Glacier is located in the northeast section of Glacier National Park. Trails leave from this valley in numerous directions, with popular hiking destinations including Iceberg Lake, Grinnell Lake and Ptarmigan Tunnel.

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